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Last Friday (7/31), Sharp Corporation made the announcement that they would finally throw in the towel and withdraw from marketing and selling televisions in “the Americas,” opting to sell the company’s LCD TV manufacturing plant in Mexico to emerging Chinese CE giant Hisense.

Sharp also indicated that it would allow Hisense to sell TVs on this side of the Pacific that are branded with the Sharp name. (Hitachi, JVC, and Toshiba have similar arrangements.) This announcement came just months after the announcement that industry marketing veteran Peter Weedfald was being hired by the company, presumably to try and turn the U.S. consumer electronics operation’s fortunes around.

Sharp also had a nice line show of nine new Ultra HD (4K) TVs back in May, signifying a commitment to the U.S. TV market. Now, it appears everything was for naught.

This has to be quite a blow to the ego of the company that basically created the LCD television business, and that just 9 years ago held a 21% worldwide market share in LCD TV shipments. Today? They’re not even on the radar, having ceded ground to Samsung, LG, Sony (who also is struggling), and most recently, Hisense and TCL.

There are nine new Ultra HDTVs in the Sharp line now, ranging from 43 inches to 80 inches.

What will happen to Sharp’s new line of Ultra HDTVs?

But it’s the right move. The company’s world-largest Generation 10 LCD fab in Sakai, Japan became a white elephant almost immediately as the world went into a recession in 2008-2009. Pressed for cash, Sharp sold 46% of the Sakai fab capacity to Hon Hai Precision Industries for about 20 cents on the dollar not long after the plant opened.

Several years of red ink followed, as did numerous rounds of financing. In the 1st quarter of this year (April – June), Sharp booked an operating loss of 28.8 billion yen ($231.87 million), down from a 4.7 billion yen profit a year prior, with a net loss of 34 billion yen ($270 million). The company still maintains it will be profitable to the tune of 80 billion yen ($644 million) by the end of March 2016.

According to a Reuters story, Sharp’s CEO Kozo Takahashi was “…open to major restructuring including some kind of strategic deal for its LCD business.” It’s well-known that Hon Hai CEO Terry Gou would love to buy the Sakai facility – he already owns almost 50% of its capacity, and Hon Hai subsidiary Foxcon sources LCD glass from Sharp for various Apple i-products. Gou also stated earlier this year that he would be willing to put more money into Sharp in exchange for a seat on its board.

While Sharp continues to wrestle with black ink, Sony posted what appeared to be positive financial results for its 1st quarter. The once-formidable CE brand logged an operating profit of 97 billion yen ($781 million), far exceeding the estimates of financial analysts.

There’s no question that camera sensor manufacturing is a lucrative business for Sony. Hundreds of millions of cameras and phones use Sony sensors, and the company announced a few months ago that it would expand sensor manufacturing capacity at two plants in Japan.

The strong first quarter was helped by an increase in operating income for its gaming (PlayStation) division of 350% to 19.5 billion yen ($153 million). So everything is coming up roses in Tokyo – right?

Not really. Sony’s beleaguered mobile phone division strung up a loss of 22.9 billion yen ($184 million) for the same quarter, and according to a Reuters story, the company is now predicting a loss of 60 billion yen ($483 million) for the fiscal year that ends next March, citing “a significant decrease in smartphone unit sales resulting from a strategic decision not to pursue scale in order to improve profitability”.

Drilling down into Sony’s Q1 FY2015 Consolidated Financial Results, the Home Entertainment and Sound group posted 168.9 billion yen ($1.36 billion dollars) in sales during Q1, with operating income of just 7 billion yen ($56 million). (That is a margin of 4.1%.) Sales were down 13.8% from the same period last year due to a “…decrease in unit sales of LCD televisions, mainly in the mid-range” and a “decrease in home audio and video unit sales reflecting contraction of the market.”

For all of 2014, Sony sold 14.6 million LCD TVs. Their current forecast calls for 11.5 million to be sold by the end of next March, a drop of 21% Y-Y. (2.6 million LCD TVs were sold by the company in the first quarter.) The TV business has long been a cash-sucker and Sony has been racking up losses in this market segment for a decade.

If Sony was to cut loose its mobile and home entertainment businesses, it would be quite the profitable company. For that matter, even the digital camera segment is seeing a downturn, as the year-long forecast for camera sales (5.9 million units) represents a drop of 30% from last year’s numbers – which were 26% down from 2013.

Aside from PlayStation, the long-term view for Sony’s consumer business isn’t good. Cameras in general are being displaced by smartphones, and even powerhouses like Samsung are seeing their mobile phone business decline as Chinese companies gain more market share in Asia.

And it’s pretty clear what’s happened to the Japanese TV business – only Sony, Sharp, and Panasonic retain a presence in the United States, and Sharp just announced it’s getting out. Look for Panasonic to do the same by year’s end, as their market share is miniscule and supporting continued sales of televisions doesn’t make much sense financially.

That just leaves Sony, who once proudly exclaimed that they had a chain of products “from lens to screen.” Well, that was in the good old days, when everyone was having a great time selling consumer electronics.

But we’re not having fun anymore…

Posted by Pete Putman, August 4, 2015 1:49 PM

About Pete Putman

Peter Putman is the president of ROAM Consulting L.L.C. His company provides training, marketing communications, and product testing/development services to manufacturers, dealers, and end-users of displays, display interfaces, and related products.

Pete edits and publishes HDTVexpert.com, a Web blog focused on digital TV, HDTV, and display technologies. He is also a columnist for Pro AV magazine, the leading trade publication for commercial AV systems integrators.