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Many HDTVexpert.com readers know I started this Web site back in 2004 as a way to provide useful information on HDTV – how to receive it, how to watch it, and how to get the most out of it.

As it turned out, the most popular articles were (and continue to be) “how to receive digital TV” tutorials. More specifically; how to select and use antennas for over-the-air DTV reception.

Over this past Memorial Day weekend, I had a chance to visit the site of one of my more interesting DTV reception challenges. The house, located high in a steep valley in southern Vermont, is completely blocked-in by a ring of hills and sits 50+ miles from the Albany, NY TV transmitters atop Helderberg Mountain. (Well, most of ‘em are up there.)

The occasion was to install a new flat screen TV and tap my ground-level UHF/VHF antenna system one more time to provide free HDTV to that screen. (The other two taps drive Zenith converter boxes.)

Sure enough, after a few hours of stringing cable and drilling holes, my brother and his wife were able to watch the French Open in HD via NBC affiliate WNYT and the Indianapolis 500 in HD from ABC affiliate WTEN. I also tossed in an upscaling DVD player so that they could enjoy their sizable collection of DVDs in widescreen ‘near’ 1080p quality.

That RF system is done – there’s nothing I can do to improve it, other than periodic maintenance and repairs. And other DTV antenna systems I’ve installed in upstate New York, on a Canadian island, in Maine, at the Jersey shore, and on the roofs of a few locals are perking along happily, with their owners enjoying one of the few great deals left in this world…free television, and in high-definition, too.

It's a work of art, and a thing of beauty.

My own system is doing a bang-up job hauling in DTV signals from New York City (65 miles), Scranton (70 miles), Philadelphia (22 miles) and Allentown (25 miles). If I get tired of all the ‘hometown cheering’ for the Phillies and Flyers on local DTV stations, I can always switch back to New York DTVs WCBS, WNBC, WABC, and WWOR and get the scoop on the Yankees, Giants, and Knicks. (And if WMCN-DT wasn’t spewing out their inane infomercials on channel 44, I could watch WTXF as well!)

The future of over-the-air DTV isn’t very clear at the moment. FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski has called for re-allocating much of the UHF TV spectrum, to be used instead for wireless broadband to solve an Internet ‘connectivity crisis.’ (Verizon chairman Ivan Seidenberg has gone on record as saying that this ‘crisis’ is largely non-existent, and that Verizon isn’t even using all of the recycled TV spectrum it bought for such an application.)

Even so, we might as well enjoy OTA DTV while it lasts, which I hope will be a long time. So that brings me to the point of this essay, which is to ask readers this: How is the DTV transition working out for you? Are you connected? Everything running hunky-dory?

Or, are you still having problems with antennas, or older set-top boxes? Still trying to pull in DTV signals in a tough location? Got noise or co-channel interference issues?

Tell me about them. I’d like to hear your stories, and will publish as many as I can.Maybe I can even solve a reception problem for you, if I get lucky.

Drop me an email at pete@hdtvexpert.com with particulars (and photos as well, if you have them). I’d like to get a sense of how many readers are still watching free over-the-air DTV. And how many have opted to drop cable, or cut back on it in favor of broadband video services like Netflix or Hulu.

It’s a very different world we’re living in than ten years ago. Back then, we got excited when a temporary antenna, braced out on our decks or stuck in a low-hanging tree, intermittently pulled in HD broadcasts of Monday Night Football. Remember how revved up you felt back then when the signal finally locked up?

Somehow, Peter Griffin and Saturday Night Live streaming to my laptop doesn’t hold quite the same thrill…

Posted by Pete Putman, June 4, 2010 3:47 PM

About Pete Putman

Peter Putman is the president of ROAM Consulting L.L.C. His company provides training, marketing communications, and product testing/development services to manufacturers, dealers, and end-users of displays, display interfaces, and related products.

Pete edits and publishes HDTVexpert.com, a Web blog focused on digital TV, HDTV, and display technologies. He is also a columnist for Pro AV magazine, the leading trade publication for commercial AV systems integrators.