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I received some interesting information from Peerless last week. This is one of the companies that makes top quality mounts for flat panel televisions. I was curious about how many people actually use mounts these days; the conventional wisdom from about five years ago was that fewer than 25% of all sets got mounted on the wall. Peerless has compiled numbers based on its customers, and has come up with an interesting trend.

For sets 19″ to 22″, they estimate 18% get mounted. For 23″ to 37″ — the sweet spot in terms of total unit sales — nearly one-third end up on mounts. For 40″ to 52″, the share jumps to 46% which is close to half. And for larger than 52″, a whopping 81% end up on the wall.

It is clear that more people are mounting their flat panels than did five years ago. Why is that? Well, you can see that larger sets are more likely to get hung on the wall, and a larger portion of the sets sold these days fall into this size range. Also, these larger sets take up a lot more space when left on their table top stands. In general, flat panel sets weigh much less for a given size than they did years ago, making it more practical to hang them.

The Peerless Slimline SUA750PU is an example of the new breed of space-saving mounts for flat panel HDTVs.

And I think another factor is that mounts have become more available to consumers who want to do it themselves, without the help of an expensive professional installer. You can find a wide range of models available, from no-name Asian products to top designs like those from Peerless. And the designs are getting more practical as well. The mount pictured here (looking down from above) can swing out left or right to a full 90 degrees, yet retracts to just one inch from the wall.

So chances are good that your next HDTV will end up on a wall.

Posted by Alfred Poor, August 2, 2010 6:00 AM

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About Alfred Poor

Alfred Poor is a well-known display industry expert, who writes the daily HDTV Almanac. He wrote for PC Magazine for more than 20 years, and now is focusing on the home entertainment and home networking markets.