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To complete the 3D off-axis viewing tests described in my previous post, I drove to a local Best Buy store on Sunday, June 27. The actual store will remain anonymous, but is located near a major shopping mall and down the street from other big box retailers.

I figured they’d have at least one Samsung and one Panasonic 3D TV demo set up and running. However, what I found when I got there just left me shaking my head in disgust.

The Samsung 3D TV demo was set up at the edge of the Magnolia sub-store, and featured their top-of-the-line UN55C9000 LED-backlight 3D LCD TV. Best Buy had it on sale for $6,299 and the demo was running a clip from Monsters vs. Aliens from Samsung’s BD-C6900 3D Blu-ray player. A comfy couch rounded out the picture.

The demo was running nicely, except that only one pair of Samsung 3D glasses was available for viewing, and it was tethered via a long cable to a stand behind the couch. That didn’t work out so well for the four people standing there when I arrived – we were all jockeying for the same pair of glasses.

Over in the Best Buy TV aisles, I found Panasonic’s TC-P50VT20 50-inch 3D plasma on an end-of-aisle shelf with not much room around it to watch the 3D demo, and no place to sit. It was on sale for $2,199. Next to the TV was a locked plexiglass box with two pairs of Panasonic active shutter glasses, and I had to hunt down a sales associate to open the box so I could squat on my knees (not too comfortable) and watch a 3D travelogue of Rome.

What caught my eye below the Panasonic plasma was an advertised special for Samsung’s BD-C6900 Blu-ray player, even though Panasonic’s BDT-350 was clearly running the show. No one seemed to be paying any attention to this discrepancy until I pointed it out to the sales associate who procured my glasses. He then quickly yanked the sign, but didn’t replace it with another. Nor was there any mention of the specially-priced Panasonic  3D TV, glasses, and Blu-ray player ‘bundle’ to be found.

Well, that doesn't look right...

Around the corner, there was another small theater set up, this time showcasing a Samsung 46-inch 3D LCD TV (I didn’t check to see which model). It, too, was running clips from Monsters vs. Aliens in 3D…except that the clips weren’t in 3D, they were 2D.

The fellow sitting on the leather couch behind me, watching through a pair of Samsung 3D glasses, seemed blissfully unaware of this fact until I mentioned it. I watched him fidget with the glasses for almost five minutes until I finally tipped him off, after which he tossed them on the couch and walked away in disgust, muttering “…I wondered why it didn’t look like 3D.”

I wandered back over to the Magnolia section, where a Panasonic 65-inch plasma was running a variety of HD video clips and advertising (of all things) Mitsubishi’s Laser VUE rear-projection TVs. (Wonder how Panasonic feels about that?) I was searching for the last 3D demo in the store – a Panasonic  TC-P50VT25 plasma set hanging on the wall.

Well, I found it, except that there were no 3D glasses available for viewing. But that didn’t matter as it turned out, because the TV was only showing 2D coverage of the World Cup. The irony of this was the empty Panasonic stand positioned in front of the TV with a placard that said, “You have to experience TV in 3D!” and exhorted me to try on a pair of 3D glasses to get the full Panasonic 3D experience. OK, so where were the glasses, exactly? And where was ESPN’s 3D World Cup video feed? Who dropped the ball here? (Sorry, bad pun…)

All in all, it was a pretty lame exhibition of 3D by Best Buy. Demo #1 had but a single pair of glasses available, while demo #2 was set up in a crowded area where no one could watch and you needed to pick a lock to get at the glasses. Demo #3 wasn’t even showing 3D content in the first place, and demo #4 was completely missing in action.

So…tell me, how is a consumer supposed to make an educated 3D TV buying decision under these circumstances?

Posted by Pete Putman, June 28, 2010 7:47 AM

About Pete Putman

Peter Putman is the president of ROAM Consulting L.L.C. His company provides training, marketing communications, and product testing/development services to manufacturers, dealers, and end-users of displays, display interfaces, and related products.

Pete edits and publishes HDTVexpert.com, a Web blog focused on digital TV, HDTV, and display technologies. He is also a columnist for Pro AV magazine, the leading trade publication for commercial AV systems integrators.