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A recent study by the NPD Group (3D 3600 Monitor) states that “…20 percent of consumers reported being “amazed” by the 3D demos in stores, versus only 15 percent who felt that way about their experience in the (3D movie) theater.”

Wow. Only twenty percent were ‘amazed?’? That’s not very impressive for a new technology that has been marketed like crazy for the past ten months, and on which most manufacturers are hanging their hopes for a robust holiday TV selling season.

The report goes on to state that “…42 percent of consumers surveyed were at least somewhat interested in watching 3D movies at home, but only 11 percent intend to purchase a 3D television.” More discouraging news, as you’d reasonably expect interest in 3D TV to be peaking now after ESPN’s 3D World Cup coverage and a slew of 3D theatrical releases that earned big bucks at the box office.

Oh, wait: I forgot – Blu-ray releases of most of 2010’s box office 3D movie hits are already tied up in exclusive TV manufacturer bundles for the foreseeable future. It’s that ‘availability of 3D content’ thing again – there’s just not enough of it out there for most consumers to justify the purchase of a new 3D TV right now.

Well, THAT gets old in a hurry!

NPD’s report also showed that consumers have objections about cost, the need to wear glasses, the relatively short time that 3D technology has been available, and whether or not all technical issues with 3D TV viewing have been addressed (whatever they are).

Of those intending to buy a 3D TV, “…more than half say that 3D enhances the viewing experience, and 42 percent agree with the statement that 3D is the future.” So, about 6% of all 1,100 respondents said that 3D enhances the viewing experience. That’s a VERY low number. (What puzzles me is that only about half of the people intending to buy a 3D TV agreed with that statement. Why buy a 3D TV in the first place, if you don’t think it is an enhancement?)

It’s becoming apparent to me that two things are really holding back 3D TV. The first is cost. There are simply too many great deals on conventional (2D) HDTVs out there, and plain vanilla HDTV (never thought I’d say that) programming is available in abundance. For folks that are upgrading older TVs, the jump to HD is big enough for now. 3D can wait. Prices need to drop and drop fast on 3D-ready sets, which can just replace existing 2D-only models.

The second problem is all of the exclusive Blu-ray bundle deals. Between the TV manufacturers who cooked up these schemes and studios who agreed to go along, they’ve managed to shoot themselves in both feet quite nicely. Marketing 101 teaches you that you don’t make a product hard to find or expensive if you expect to sell a lot of it. (Unless it’s an upscale brand with a solid reputation, like Ferrari or Tiffany.)

We’re closing in on Black Friday and a major selling season for TVs, and right now, it looks like most consumers will be ‘sitting it out’ this year with 3D.  (Hey, TV sales are tough all over. 6th Avenue Electronics can’t even get rid of Panasonic 2D 50-inch 720p plasma TVs for $397, and that deal has been running for almost a month!)

Posted by Pete Putman, October 26, 2010 1:58 PM

About Pete Putman

Peter Putman is the president of ROAM Consulting L.L.C. His company provides training, marketing communications, and product testing/development services to manufacturers, dealers, and end-users of displays, display interfaces, and related products.

Pete edits and publishes HDTVexpert.com, a Web blog focused on digital TV, HDTV, and display technologies. He is also a columnist for Pro AV magazine, the leading trade publication for commercial AV systems integrators.